Graveyards’ Tour in Edinburgh

I must say that if I hadn’t lived in Edinburgh for a while I would have not understood why someone would even think of visiting a cemetery or worse doing a tour of cemeteries, but here is the thing. Edinburgh is a spooky town and cemeteries are part of its enchant and charm, so I hope you enjoy the beauty of these places as I have.

Old Calton Burial Ground

Just 100 meters away from my office, this graveyard just reopened its doors after going under some major works. The first thing you see from its entrance is the tall obelisk which commemorates five political martyrs who fought for parliamentary reform in the 19th century. The philosopher David Hume is also buried in this graveyard.

 

Greyfriars Kirkyard

Probably the most popular and visited cemetery in Edinburgh due to two very important figures: Bobby and Tom Riddell.

The former is a wee doggy that has stolen the heart of many for having attended to his owner’s graveyard till his death. The latter is the graveyard made famous by J.K. Rowling with her fantastic Harry Potter tales. She was in fact living in Edinburgh at the time and was inspired from many buildings and iconic symbols of the beautiful ‘Auld Reekie’.

New Calton Graveyard

I accidentally entered this one with my friend Auri the other day. It was built to replace the Old Calton Burial Ground and can be accessed from Regent Road, where you have stunning views over Holyrood Palace and Arthur Seat.

Canongate Kirkyard

Used as a graveyard since the late 17th century, this cemetery hosts the founder of economy, the famous Adam Smith.

 

St Cuthbert’s

An impressive graveyard with stunning views of the castle. A great place to stroll around where you can find quietness.

 

Dean Graveyard

Further away from the city center, this graveyard is the perfect excuse for a walk by the Water of Leith, a lovely path by the river which brings you to the Modern Gallery and from which you can access this peaceful graveyard. It’s less known and there are less tourists walking around. It’s also newer and more symmetrical. A lot of Celtic crosses and unique tombs in this one.

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